MBSC Theology Seminar

Eric Lehner

Select Wednesdays from 10:00am-12:00pm

MBSC Seminar is the capstone course of the Master of Biblical Studies in Chaplaincy degree. The purpose of this course is to (1) review and consolidate skills across the spectrum of disciplines within the MBSC program, (2) assess student competencies on the programmatic level, and (3) position the student to articulate and defend a comprehensive statement of the major doctrines of Scripture.

Ministry:   The Ministry portion of the MBSC Seminar will revisit and evaluate the ministry portion of the MBSC curriculum devoted to military ministry and counseling. As a result of this portion of the MBSC Seminar, the student will: 1) develop an awareness of the degree to which he is able to communicate biblical truth in the context of the military chaplaincy, 2) develop an awareness of the degree to which he is able to articulate the sufficiency of Scripture for addressing any spiritual need, and 3) develop an awareness of the degree to which he is able to discharge the various roles of chaplain ministry in the context of the chaplain corps within a branch of the U. S. armed forces.

New Testament:  As a result of the New Testament evaluations, students will be able to: 1) demonstrate their ability to recall and utilize Greek language skills in the translation of the Greek NT, 2) demonstrate their ability to evaluate and suggest hermeneutical principles essential for NT study and theological formulation, and 3) demonstrate their ability to articulate first century religious, social, and political circumstances that form the background to the NT.

Theology: The Theology portion of the MBSC Seminar is designed to integrate substance of courses in systematic theology, church history, and hermeneutics. This integration is accomplished through the composition of a comprehensive statement of systematic theology. As a result of this portion of the MBSC Seminar, the student will: 1) synthesize learning from previous courses in systematic theology, church history, and hermeneutics, 2) formulate a comprehensive theological statement that is grounded in Scripture, clear in expression, consistent in terms of method and hermeneutic, and conversant with the history of Christian doctrine, and 3) present the theological statement orally in a manner that is clear and persuasive.