He Saw the Grace of God

main image

How does one see a doctrine? In Acts 11:19-26, Barnabas was sent by the church of Jerusalem to the multi-cultural, affluent, and burgeoning city of Antioch in Syria. The Jerusalem church had recently heard that the gospel of Jesus had penetrated this influential city “and a great number of people believed and turned to the Lord” (11:21). When Barnabas arrived from Jerusalem, the text gives an unusual account of what he discovered; it says, “he saw the grace of God and was glad” (11:23). What did Luke mean by this comment? And how is it possible to see grace in the lives of believers?

Read More →

Not To Abolish, But To Fulfill

main image

In his first recorded sermon (Mathew 5-7), Jesus makes a remarkable statement that highlights his purpose for entering this world of humanity as the God-Man. He says, “Do not think that I came to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I did not come to abolish, but to fulfill” (NASB).  The general tenor of this statement cannot be missed....

Read More →

God Our Savior

main image

The careful reader of 1 Timothy will observe a curious and unique phrase, which opens Paul’s letter (1:1): “God our Savior.” In fact, in this letter Paul only refers to the Father as “Savior” (1:1; 2:3; 4:10), and he also does it again three more times in his “twin letter” of Titus (1:3; 2:10; 3:4). This begs the question, Why did the Apostle choose to identify the Father as “our Savior” in 1:1 instead of His Son, Jesus?

Read More →

Chasing the Wind

main image

The NET Bible translates Ecclesiastes 1:14 in striking but despairing words: “I reflected on everything that is accomplished by man on earth, and I concluded: Everything he has accomplished is futile – like chasing the wind!” The phrase “chasing the wind” is a masterful metaphorical idiom from the pen of King Solomon. He uses this expression to create a sense of futility and hopelessness in the mind of his reader.

Read More →

Previous12345678910