One of the King's Mighties

Thomas Brooks (1608-1680) was an English Puritan of remarkable influence. Charles Spurgeon found the work of Thomas Brooks so helpful that he published selections of it under the title Smooth Stones Taken from Ancient Brooks. In the preface of this book, Spurgeon introduced Brooks as “one of the King’s mighties . . . of the race of giants . . . head and shoulders above all the people, not in stature (like Saul), but in mind, soul, and grace.” 

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Posted by Eric Lehner with

Is There Tension Between Law and Grace?

Today the words “gospel” and “law” are often held in tension, but need it be this way? When reflecting on the book of Romans, most of us view the overarching theme as the Gospel of God (1:1, 9, 15-17). Surely Martin Luther was right when he said, “This Epistle is really the chief part of the N.T. and the very purest Gospel, and is worthy not only that every Christian should know it word for word, by heart, but occupy himself with it every day.” Yet many might be surprised to learn that within the letter to the Romans, the word “law” is used more than 70 times; it is used more in this letter than in Paul’s other 12 N.T. letters combined.

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Posted by Daniel Davey with

The Christian Slave

Are there two words in the English language more contradictory than “Christian” and “slavery”? Whereas the term “Christian" connotes a harmonious relationship of peace with God and our neighbors, the term “slavery” is rife with cruelty and oppression.  It is hard to imagine two words more distinct from each other in our vocabulary. Yet in Romans 6:19, Paul calls on all believers of Rome to “offer your bodily members as slaves to righteousness leading to sanctification.” In effect, he calls on every Christian to be a “slave.” Let’s look deeper into what Paul means when he talks about slavery in the context of the Christian life.

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Grand Canyon Travelogue

In July I had a unique opportunity—white-water rafting on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. 7 days, 190 miles, 69 rapids, 2 boats, 28 scholars. The purpose of the expedition was to consider the geological and biblical evidences regarding the canyon’s origin. Is the Grand Canyon old or young? Was it formed slowly by a little water or rapidly by lots of water?

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Posted by Mark Hassler with

Why I Am a Dispensationalist

I am a dispensationalist in my theological conclusions — not because I carried a Scofield Reference Bible to church as an 18 year-old, nor because the man that led me to Christ was a dispensationalist, nor because I attended a dispensational seminary for my theological education. Each of the preceding factors encouraged me along the way, but they were not decisive. Let me share three concepts that cause me to see dispensational contours in the pages of Scripture.

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Posted by Michael Windsor with

The God of Grace in the Old Testament

Many believers associate the grace of God only with the New Testament. Passages in the NT (i.e. John 1:17, Gal. 2:21; 5:14) draw such a clear distinction between the Law of Moses and the grace of God in Jesus Christ that one might mistakenly conclude that the Old Testament God was not a God of grace. 

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Posted by Eric Lehner with

The Tears and Theology of Jeremiah

No writings in the Bible are so little read and understood, yet more moving and convicting, than the books of Jeremiah the prophet. The book that bears his name may be the longest prophetic book in the OT; however, as Charles Feinberg notes, “Jeremiah has suffered from neglect.” G. Campbell Morgan aptly calls us to study this prophet’s writings: “No prophet of the long and illustrious line had a more thankless task than he, and none was more magnificently and heroically true to his sacred ministry.”

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