Courses

Fall 2020

August 24 – December 4

Resident Classes: Aug. 24 – Nov. 20 | Online Exam Week: Nov. 20 – Dec. 4


Exegesis of Synoptic Gospels

Thomas K. Dailey

3 credit hours | Wednesdays 9:00a–12:15p | Resident Only

Upon completion of this course, the student will a) identify exegetical features that are particularly related to conducting exegesis in the synoptics; b) evaluate the profitability of the traditional historical-critical approach to the study of the synoptics; c) gain familiarity with the use of the Synopsis of the Four Gospels through the analysis of multiple pericopae; and d) formulate a synthesis of the synoptic parallels in order to highlight a particular tendency found in Mark’s presentation of the teachings and deeds of Jesus.

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Exposition of Romans

Daniel K. Davey

3 credit hours | Thursdays 9:00a–12:15p | Resident & Online

The Epistle to the Romans is the New Testament’s clearest statement on the Gospel of God. This course will examine the purpose, structure and content of this Letter. Special attention will be given to the background and occasion of the Letter, which is imperative for a proper understand of the Letter’s argument. Particular emphasis will be given to Paul’s understanding of the Law in light of the grace of Christ. Finally, this course is designed to prepare each student to accurately and authoritatively communicate this book in either a classroom or pastoral setting. As a result of taking this course, the student will be able to demonstrate a command of Paul’s understanding of the Gospel of God and its attendant core themes. The student will exit the class with a deeper working knowledge of the Romans Letter which will allow him to identify the reason Paul wrote the Letter, and the structure of the Letter which Paul uses to pursue his theme for his readers.   

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Greek Grammar 1

Thomas K. Dailey

3 credit hours | Mondays & Fridays 9:00–10:30am | Resident Only

Students giving requisite attention to the course requirements and actively participating in the course discussions, translation exercises, and vocabulary drills will emerge from this course with the ability to: (1) write and pronounce NT Greek terms and phrases, (2) identify key morphological features that signal different grammatical functions and semantic value based on an introductory level of Greek vocabulary, and (3) perform elementary translation of the Greek New Testament.

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Hebrew Exegetical Method 1

Mark A. Hassler

3 credit hours | Thursdays 9:00a–12:15p | Resident Only

As a result of taking this course, the student should be able to (a) summarize the recommended research methodology for biblical exegesis, (b) produce a clear and accurate translation of a selected passage using a Hebrew lexicon, (c) evaluate more effectively the published Bible translations in light of the Hebrew text, (d) identify and define the grammatical and literary features of one's selected passage with the assistance of appropriate resources, and (e) construct a structural diagram of a selected passage using a computer (an adequate diagram retains the Hebrew word order and displays the syntactical and literary components accurately and neatly).

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Introduction to Biblical Counseling

Roger G. DePriest

3 credit hours | Wednesdays 9:00a–12:15p | Resident & Online

As a result of taking this course, the student will be able to trace the history of the modern biblical counseling movement, understand how biblical counseling coheres with and is a subset of Christian discipleship, recognize and apply the basic elements of biblical counseling and apply them to case studies, and, finally, develop a general understanding of the broad categories of personal and interpersonal issues that are indicative of the human condition.

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Man, Sin, & Holy Spirit

Eric J. Lehner & Michael H. Windsor

3 credit hours | Tuesdays 9:00a–12:15p | Resident & Online

As a result of attending the lectures, participating in class and small group discussions, completing the reading, and writing the position papers, the student will be able to: a) demonstrate comprehension of the scope of the biblical doctrines of humanity, sin and the Holy Spirit; b) assess the validity of a theological position in terms relative to its corresponding theological method; c) justify theological conclusions on the ground of contextually interpreted passages of Scripture; and d) compose theological expressions in terms that are conscious of and consistent with one’s own methodological principles.

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Preaching OT & NT Narrative

Brent A. Belford & Sam E. Horn

4 credit hours | September 21–25 | Resident Only

As a result of taking this course, the student will be able to trace the history of the modern biblical counseling movement, understand how biblical counseling coheres with and is a subset of Christian discipleship, recognize and apply the basic elements of biblical counseling and apply them to case studies, and, finally, develop a general understanding of the broad categories of personal and interpersonal issues that are indicative of the human condition.

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Puritan History & Theology

Eric J. Lehner & Michael H. Windsor

4 credit hours | Select Mondays | Resident Only | ThM Option

Puritan History & Theology is a research seminar dedicated to the reading and analysis of the works of history and theology of Puritanism. Students will be able to 1) prepare a detailed and contextualized account of the life and theology of a key individual in Puritanism and 2) describe and evaluate beliefs and practices characteristic of Puritanism, and to situate these in historical context. 

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